mumblingsage:

thedancingwriter:

All writing advice is subjective, but there are some mistakes in writing that WILL ensure your novel’s failure, not only to your readers but to those who might be your potential agent or publisher. I’ve never really come across these mistakes when I used…

07.07.14 ♥ 1950

thecutestofthecute:

Dogs with butterflies ehe he heimage

Dogs with butterflies oho ho hoimage

Dogs with butterflies aha ha ha

image

07.06.14 ♥ 59161

unexplained-events:

Have you guys heard about the new monument being built for Oklahoma’s Statehouse? The statue is a direct response to the state’s installation of a Ten Commandments monument outside the Capitol in 2012. 

How fucking metal

SOURCE

07.06.14 ♥ 4365
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07.06.14 ♥ 60743

wordsandchocolate:

I made a slideshow about how to create a fictional character… I got most of the information from the ‘start writing fiction’ (free) course on the OpenUniversity website and found it incredibly useful so here’s a visual version for you :)

07.06.14 ♥ 170934

leppu:

SO YEAH the internet and scanners weren’t working yesterday so I’m updating a day late, HELLO EVERYONE

07.06.14 ♥ 462

leppu:

wonderful

07.06.14 ♥ 1539
07.05.14 ♥ 172532
best-tattoos:

Red Bunny Tattoo

best-tattoos:

Red Bunny Tattoo

07.05.14 ♥ 20
novacorps:


"Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible, but still clear and effective."
Tips, tricks, and resources for the basics of good online typography. Does not apply to print. There always exceptions to the advice below. 

GENERAL TIPS

Align your text left. text-align: left; The ragged right hand side tends help you keep your place while reading.
Make your leading 140%. line-height: 140%; This makes it more legible. 
User proper punctuation. Em dashes instead of hyphens. Curly quotes instead of dumb quotes. You can find the codes here.
Look into good fonts. Font packs and best free fonts lists are your friends.

SERIFS VS. SANS SERIFS

Serifs. a.k.a Times New Roman, Georgia. Typically used for headers. Easy to read. Can stand out too much. Work better over 12pt. Most have poorly spaced lettering (which means letters may run together) and serifs tend to make letters blur together. 
Sans Serifs. a.k.a Arial, Helvetica. Typically used for body text. Take up less space. Overused. Visually appealing. Tend to read better small (but blur at a larger size). Most people can read sans serif fonts faster online. 

CONTRAST AND FLOW

Most people skim to find the information that most interests them. So, blocks of text should be split up and differentiated. This also prevents the text from merging together and becoming overwhelming. You can do this by making consistent contrasts between sections of text like the page title, header, sub-headers, body text, etc.
You can mix and match any of the following methods for emphasizing text. However, using too many effects can clutter the document and make it confusing.
Space. Add space before headings to separate them from body text. Use indentation (such as blockquotes) to distinguish body text, bulleted lists, quotations, or example text. Make sure padding around images and text is consistent.
Size. Large text is used for headers. Medium for body text. Small for captions or annotations.
Fonts. Stick to using only two fonts if possible (using more than three fonts tends to make things look cluttered). Use a serif with a sans serif for an easy visual difference. Pick something simple and pair it with something that stands out. Similarly, using too many font sizes, colors, or otherwise on a page will make them fight for the reader’s attention instead of adding emphasis. Alsomake sure you mix the right fonts together — or simply look for some pre-madecombinations.
Colors. Faded colors indicate something is disabled, not available, has limited access, or is less important. Bright colors, meanwhile, are great for grabbing readers attention and often work better than bolding. Smaller, lighter shades of color work well together to de-emphasize text. As a rule of thumb, avoid putting colored text aside from red (which functions as an indication to stop and read something) within body text because readers will assume the colored text is a link and click it. Color is best used in section headers.
Capitalization. Use for headers/titles but not long stretches of text (people stop reading because it strains the eyes and looks like you’re shouting). If you need to use words set in caps in the body, use small caps LIKE SO. 
Style. Text should not be underlined in body text except for links. Instead, use bolding and italics. Do not bold/italicize an entire line of text or more.
Boxes. Boxes (such as pull quotes) can be used to frame different sections. 

COLOR

Contrast text with your background. A trick to see if you have enough contrast is to take a screen shot of your page and desaturate it (make it grayscale). Alternatively you can use this website.
Black/White. Computer screens have a greater black/white contrast than print so it strains the eyes to read #ffffff (white) on #000000 (black) and #000000 on #ffffff. If you have to use a black background, use a lighter black (e.g. #333333). Very light greys (e.g. #f7f7f7) are recommended as a background color while lighter blacks (e.g. #333333) make good text colors.

SPACING

White space is important. It makes the page easier to scan among other things.
When floating images tweak the space. That way the text is spaced evenly around the picture like so. Padding has four values (ex. 0px). They specify whether you want to add padding to the top, right, bottom and left (in that order). So, if you only needed to add 10px worth of padding to the left of your image, you might use the code:  float: right; padding: 0px 0px 0px 10px;".

RESOURCES/REFERENCES

Typographic Contrast and Flow.Methods for creating typographic contrast.Design Principles Cheatsheet. Cheatsheet for creating a well designed website.Colr. Load an image and get a color scheme from it.Paletton. Color scheme designer.Color Hexa. Gives you information, schemes, alternatives, previews, shades and tints, tones, and blindness simulators for hex colors.Wordmark.it. Helps you pick a font by displaying a word with all the fonts installed on your computer.

novacorps:

"Make all visual distinctions as subtle as possible, but still clear and effective."

Tips, tricks, and resources for the basics of good online typography. Does not apply to print. There always exceptions to the advice below. 

GENERAL TIPS

Align your text left. text-align: left; The ragged right hand side tends help you keep your place while reading.

Make your leading 140%. line-height: 140%; This makes it more legible

User proper punctuation. Em dashes instead of hyphens. Curly quotes instead of dumb quotes. You can find the codes here.

Look into good fonts. Font packs and best free fonts lists are your friends.

SERIFS VS. SANS SERIFS

Serifs. a.k.a Times New Roman, Georgia. Typically used for headers. Easy to read. Can stand out too much. Work better over 12pt. Most have poorly spaced lettering (which means letters may run together) and serifs tend to make letters blur together. 

Sans Serifs. a.k.a Arial, Helvetica. Typically used for body text. Take up less space. Overused. Visually appealing. Tend to read better small (but blur at a larger size). Most people can read sans serif fonts faster online. 

CONTRAST AND FLOW

Most people skim to find the information that most interests them. So, blocks of text should be split up and differentiated. This also prevents the text from merging together and becoming overwhelming. You can do this by making consistent contrasts between sections of text like the page title, header, sub-headers, body text, etc.

You can mix and match any of the following methods for emphasizing text. However, using too many effects can clutter the document and make it confusing.

  • Space. Add space before headings to separate them from body text. Use indentation (such as blockquotes) to distinguish body text, bulleted lists, quotations, or example text. Make sure padding around images and text is consistent.
  • Size. Large text is used for headers. Medium for body text. Small for captions or annotations.
  • Fonts. Stick to using only two fonts if possible (using more than three fonts tends to make things look cluttered). Use a serif with a sans serif for an easy visual difference. Pick something simple and pair it with something that stands out. Similarly, using too many font sizes, colors, or otherwise on a page will make them fight for the reader’s attention instead of adding emphasis. Alsomake sure you mix the right fonts together — or simply look for some pre-madecombinations.
  • Colors. Faded colors indicate something is disabled, not available, has limited access, or is less important. Bright colors, meanwhile, are great for grabbing readers attention and often work better than bolding. Smaller, lighter shades of color work well together to de-emphasize text. As a rule of thumb, avoid putting colored text aside from red (which functions as an indication to stop and read something) within body text because readers will assume the colored text is a link and click it. Color is best used in section headers.
  • Capitalization. Use for headers/titles but not long stretches of text (people stop reading because it strains the eyes and looks like you’re shouting). If you need to use words set in caps in the body, use small caps LIKE SO
  • Style. Text should not be underlined in body text except for links. Instead, use bolding and italics. Do not bold/italicize an entire line of text or more.
  • Boxes. Boxes (such as pull quotes) can be used to frame different sections. 
COLOR

Contrast text with your background. A trick to see if you have enough contrast is to take a screen shot of your page and desaturate it (make it grayscale). Alternatively you can use this website.

Black/White. Computer screens have a greater black/white contrast than print so it strains the eyes to read #ffffff (white) on #000000 (black) and #000000 on #ffffff. If you have to use a black background, use a lighter black (e.g. #333333). Very light greys (e.g. #f7f7f7) are recommended as a background color while lighter blacks (e.g. #333333) make good text colors.

SPACING

White space is important. It makes the page easier to scan among other things.

When floating images tweak the space. That way the text is spaced evenly around the picture like so. Padding has four values (ex. 0px). They specify whether you want to add padding to the top, right, bottom and left (in that order). So, if you only needed to add 10px worth of padding to the left of your image, you might use the code:  float: right; padding: 0px 0px 0px 10px;".

RESOURCES/REFERENCES

Typographic Contrast and Flow.Methods for creating typographic contrast.
Design Principles Cheatsheet. Cheatsheet for creating a well designed website.
Colr. Load an image and get a color scheme from it.
Paletton. Color scheme designer.
Color Hexa. Gives you information, schemes, alternatives, previews, shades and tints, tones, and blindness simulators for hex colors.
Wordmark.it. Helps you pick a font by displaying a word with all the fonts installed on your computer.

07.05.14 ♥ 1739
07.05.14 ♥ 107723

bumblegoo:

haldane’s coven (x)

06.07.14 ♥ 2

#29382

bumblegoo:

fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment:

Draw your characters gender-swapped. 

image

sarjo and twill ’ w ‘

bumblegoo:

scribblerific:

part 1 of art trade with jackie - her character Twede and her friend’s character Senja

i think my heart just stopped

what if our otp becomes tumblr famous enough to have fans WHAT DO WE DO THEN

cultcouture:

When in doubt, wing it out.

06.07.14 ♥ 35014